Early Online (Volume - 6 | Issue - 1)

Khat use and users readiness to quit khat, qualitative research in the case of street people in Addis Ababa

Published on: 6th January, 2022

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 9395221764

Khat is a huge green plant that thrives at high elevations throughout the region ranging from southern to eastern Africa, and in the Arabian Peninsula. However, chewing Khat became common among the young (youth). The objectives of this study were to investigate the khat use behavior, users’ self-understanding, and their readiness of stopping using khat among street people in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. A Semi-structured interview was used to collect information from street people in Addis Ababa. 15 participants were individually interviewed and 11 of them were males and the rest 4 were female participants. The data acquired from the interview was analyzed using descriptive and thematic analysis. Chewing Khat was identified as a common activity among the youth living in the streets of Addis Ababa. Most of the participants have an awareness of the use of khat and its effects on their health but they are still struggling to stop it. While the readiness to stop using khat was investigated and the addiction behavior and the lifestyle of the participants were affecting them from stooping chewing Khat.
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Ceftriaxone in pediatrics: Indication, adverse drug reaction, contraindication and drug interaction

Published on: 5th April, 2022

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 9470678055

Ceftriaxone is having many uses and useful “third-generation” cephalosporin that necessitates being given every day. Ceftriaxone acts as binds to one or many of the penicillin-binding proteins which inhibit the final transpeptidoglycan step of peptidoglycan synthesis in the bacterial cell wall, thus inhibiting biosynthesis and arresting cell wall assembly resulting in bacterial cell death.Ceftriaxone-associated biliary adverse events in children less than eighteen years cause biliary pseudolithiasis and scarcely nephrolithiasis often happen in children less than eighteen years after receiving overdoses of ceftriaxone. Ceftriaxone perhaps binds with calcium and figure insoluble chelation leading to biliary pseudolithiasis. Cholelithiasis, increased biliary thickness, and pseudolithiasis rarely happen in a period of being a child, but there are two modes of distribu¬tion described by two peaks, the first being at an early stage of development and the second is a period of life when a child develops into an adult. Hyperbilirubinemia is significantly contraindicated for neonates administrated ceftriaxone, particularly premature neonates, because of the displacement of bilirubin from albumin-binding sites and increase in blood concentrations of free bilirubin. A child than one month old and a child less than twelve-month old in special are at great risk of poor results because of bilirubin encephalopathy. Coincident administrations of ceftriaxone with aminoglycosides such as gentamycin and loop diuretics (furosemide) perhaps increase the risk of nephrotoxicity (rapid degeneration in the kidney function to the toxic outcome of double or triple medications). Coincident administrations of ceftriaxone with anticoagulant medications such as warfarin are associated with bleeding due to increased prothrombin times, which is reversible with vitamin K.
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Addiction and leadership: How authentic and transformative leaders are emerging from the adversity of substance use disorder

Published on: 7th July, 2022

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 9575224206

Objectives: This novel study explores the leadership traits held by people with substance use disorder. The purpose of this study is to help advance understanding of the positive qualities people with substance use disorder possess which can produce positive societal and organizational benefits once that person enters recovery. Additionally, this understanding can provide insight into effective treatment approaches that incorporate personal attributes that are present within active addiction. Methods: A qualitative methodology was used which included semi-structured interviews, observations, and a focus group which allowed the researcher to conduct a thematic coding analysis. The participants came from diverse backgrounds and included participants from multiple regions across the United States. Leadership was defined as having various dimensions of effective leadership that are found in both Transformational and Authentic Leadership Theories. Results: The findings revealed that people in addiction possess numerous leadership traits which position them for effective leadership and are further enhanced during their recovery journey. The top three traits which emerged from the data indicate that people in recovery from addiction are authentic, tenacious, and empathetic. Additionally, those in recovery have strong abilities to empower and inspire others and demonstrate posttraumatic growth which helps establish significant bonds of trust and commitment among followers. Conclusion: The impact of this study will change how people view addiction. Identifying the hidden treasures of leadership which are present in those struggling with addiction could illuminate recovery pathways that help identify purpose and value. This would not only advance treatment opportunities but greatly assist organizations that need strong leadership. People with substance use disorder have all the right tools to become effective leaders, and this understanding can help mitigate the stigma associated with addiction and paint it in a more positive light. 
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat